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Image Gogol: Dead Souls
Gogol’s great Russian classic is the Pickwick Papers of Russian Literature. It takes a sharp but
humorous look at life in all its strata, but especially the devious complexities in Russia with its
landowners and serfs. We are introduced to Chichikov, a businessman who, in order to trick
the tax authorities, buys up dead ‘souls’ or serfs whose names still appear on the government
census. Despite being a dealer in phantom crimes and paper ghosts, he is the most beguiling
of Gogol’s characters. Gogol’s obsession with attempting to display ‘the untold riches of the
Russian soul’ eventually led him to madness, religious mania and death. Dismissed by him as
merely ‘a pale introduction to the great epic poem which is taking shape in my mind’, Dead
Souls is the culmination of Gogol’s genius.


£45.50
Image Behn: Oroonoko
A vivid love story and adventure tale, Oroonoko is a heroic slave narrative about a royal prince
and his fight for freedom. The eponymous hero, Oroonoko, deemed royalty in one world and
slave in another, is torn from his noble status and betrayed into slavery in Surinam, where he is
reduced to chains, fetters and shackles. But his high spirit and admirable character will not be
suppressed… The book was groundbreaking at the time and is considered to be one of the first
novels written in English. Its condemnation of slavery and Europeans, and striking portrayal of
sexuality and violence, shrouded Behn’s name in controversy for years after it was published.


£13.99
Image The Great Poets: Matthew Arnold
Considered the bridge between romanticism and modernism, Matthew Arnold wrote verse that is simple, unadorned and straightforward. From the hypnotic and beautiful lines of Dover Beach to the pastoral narrative of The Scholar and the Gipsy, Arnold cast a gaze at the main intellectual issues of the nineteenth century while giving a timeless insight into man and nature. This collection covers his major poetic works, including the narrative poems, sonnets and elegiac poems, illuminating the lyricism and serenity of Arnold’s best poetry.

£8.99
Image Hobbes: Leviathan
Born out of the political turmoil of the English Civil War, Leviathan stands out as one of the
most influential political and philosophical texts of the seventeenth century. It argues for the
restoration of the monarchy, in light of the Republic, and calls for a commonwealth ruled
by an authoritative, autocratic figure with absolute sovereignty. This would put an end to all
controversy, war and fear, and establish peace via social contract. Over the course of the
book Hobbes targets Christianity and contemporary philosophic methods, rejecting the idea
of spirits and souls, and arguing for a philosophy to end divisiveness and provide indisputable
conclusions. These highly controversial theses led to book burnings in 1666 and Hobbes being
dubbed the ‘Monster of Malmsbury’.


£60.00
Image Henry James: The Ambassadors
£54.99
Image D.H. Lawrence: Women in Love
£59.99
Image Mikhail Lermontov: A Hero of Our Time
Grigori Aleksandrovich Pechorin is an enigma: arrogant, cocky, melancholic, brave, cynic, romantic, loner, socialite, soldier, free soul, and yet, victim of the world, he eludes definition and remains a mystery to those who know him. Just who is he? And what does he hope to achieve? Evolving from first person to third person, and then into a diary, A Hero of our Time takes on a variety of forms to interrogate Pechorin’s cryptic character and his unusual philosophy, providing breathtaking descriptions of the Caucasus along the way. The novel has been hailed as an influence on such writers as Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov, and is a striking take on Lord Byron’s ‘superfluous man’; it hearkens back to the teaching of Machiavelli, while anticipating the future work of Nietzsche.

£24.99
Image David Angus: More Great Inventors and Their Invent
£11.99
Image SZABO:THE DOOR
Intense, brilliant and moving, The Door is a compelling story about the relationship between two women of opposing backgrounds and personalities: one, an intellectual and writer; the other, her housekeeper, a mysterious, elderly woman who sets her own rules and abjures religion, education, pretense and any kind of authority. Beneath this hardened exterior of Emerence lies a painful story that must be concealed. With great insight and clarity The Door explores themes of love, loyalty, pride and privacy, and the barriers and secrets that govern them.

£29.99
Image Barbara Euphan Todd: More About Worzel Gummidge
£13.99
Image Barbara Euphan Todd: Worzel Gummidge and Saucy Nan
When Worzel hears that John and Susan have gone on holiday to the seaside, he decides that he and Earthy Mangold should join them. In the town of Seashell he finds a kindred spirit in the ship’s figurehead, Saucy Nancy, and many dramas follow, including one in which Earthy Mangold is swept out to sea. This is the fourth in the series of Barbara Euphan Todd’s Worzel Gummidge novels and it dates from 1947.

£16.99
Image David Angus: Great Victorians
The Victorian era was a time of great change and rapid progress. Britain was undergoing the most tremendous development. Scientific discoveries had prompted the Industrial Revolution, which made Britain the world leader in iron and steel production. Science was undergoing a revolution, enabled by the ground-breaking work of Michael Faraday, who led the Royal Institution. Great swathes of Central Africa were mapped by the explorer David Livingstone and the understanding of humankind's place in the world was being redefined by the theories of the great naturalist Charles Darwin. Brunel's steam-driven ships were connecting continents and Florence Nightingale's work in hospitals helped lay the foundations for modern nursing. In literature, Charles Dickens put the lives of ordinary men and women at the centre of great novels for the first time, and in politics Britain was completely transformed by the reforms of William Gladstone. Written exclusively for Naxos AudioBooks, Great Victorians captures a fascinating period in world history.

£10.99
Image Henry James: The Europeans
After the collapse of her marriage to an illustrious German prince, Baroness Eugenia Münster arrives in America with her brother, in search of wealthy New England relatives. The duo have an immediate impact on their American cousins, the Wentworths. The Baroness captures the eye of young Clifford Wentworth, and his girlfriend’s older brother Robert; meanwhile, Felix falls for his American cousin Gertrude. The Wentworths are overawed by their European cousins and their frivolous lifestyle. What unfolds is a delightful comedy of manners that contrasts the apparently sophisticated and lighthearted Europeans with the serious and puritanical Americans. At times reminiscent of Jane Austen, The Europeans contains beautiful and vivid descriptions of mid-19th century upperclass New England life.

£24.99
Image Thomas Hardy: Desperate Remedies
Thomas Hardy’s first published novel, Desperate Remedies is a thrilling blend of Gothic mystery and love-triangle romance. After the untimely death of their parents, Cytheria and Owen Graye must go out into the world and fend for themselves. Cytheria’s journey leads her to the dark and mysterious household of Miss Aldclyffe, a capricious and eccentric woman, who steers Cytheria into a love affair with her charismatic steward Aeneous Manston. All is not what it seems, and Cytheria finds herself entangled in a violent web of lust, murder, deception and blackmail. With its beautiful and evocative scenes, along with themes of fate and class, the novel contains many traces of Hardy’s signature style, and is a unique take on the Victorian ‘sensation’ novel.

£49.99
Image Samuel Richardson: Clarissa, Volume 1
A milestone in the history of the novel, Samuel Richardson’s epistolary and elaborate Clarissa follows the life of a chaste young woman desperate to protect her virtue. When beautiful Clarissa Harlowe is forced to marry the rich but repulsive Mr Solmes, she refuses, much to her family’s chagrin. She escapes their persecution with the help of Mr Lovelace, a dashing and seductive rake, but soon finds herself in a far worse dilemma. Lovelace is a devil in disguise: he promptly imprisons Clarissa, and is determined to break her will. Terrifying and enlightening, Clarissa weaves a tapestry of narrative experimentation into a gripping morality tale of good triumphing over evil. The recording is divided into three volumes.

£85.00
Image Anthony Trollope: The Eustace Diamonds
Before Sir Florian Eustace dies, he gives his beloved wife Lizzie a beautiful and expensive diamond necklace valued over £10,000. Dispute soon rages between the Eustace family and the manipulative and conniving Lizzie: it's claimed that the diamonds are a precious family heirloom but Lizzie argues they were a gift. Is she lying? As the family's lawyer determines to reunite them with the jewels, Lizzie resorts to increasingly desperate measures, until one day the jewels are stolen. Who is responsible? The third novel in Trollope's Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds is a wonderfully absorbing blend of dark cynicism and humour.

£80.00
Image Charles Baudelaire: The Flowers of Evil
Sensual, macabre, joyous and liberating, The Flowers of Evil, or, Les Fleurs du Mal, is a beautifully debauched reflection on dreams, sin, life and death. With subjects ranging from travel to drugs, sex to faith, sleep to contemplation, Baudelaire finds new beauty in the most sinister and corrupt of situations. His morbid and nightmarish Romanticism was completely unique: cynical and bleak, but also inspiring, lifted by magnificent imagery and melodious language. The book was highly controversial upon its release and Napoleon III's government prosecuted Baudelaire for 'an insult to public decency'; six of the poems were banned until as recently as 1949.

£16.99
Image Petronius: Satyricon
Petronius' Satyricon is a rampant and vivacious Roman adventure dating back to the first century, during the reign of Nero. It follows the exploits of Encolpius, an impoverished exgladiator, and his boy-lover Giton. The action is fleet and the narrative sweeping: over the course of their journey we meet a host of lewd and comical rogues, including beggars, prostitutes, poets, sodomites and pedants, and witness many strange and curious events, including a remarkably vulgar multi-course feast, hosted by the pompous nouveau riche Trimalchio. Considered the Odyssey of the illicit and debaucherous, the Satyricon is an exhilarating look at the underbelly of Roman society.

£24.99
Image Junichiro Tanizaki: In Praise of Shadows
‘Were it not for shadows there would be no beauty.’ In Praise of Shadows is an eloquent tribute to the austere beauty of traditional Japanese aesthetics. Through architecture, ceramics, theatre, food, women and even toilets, Tanizaki explains the essence of shadows and darkness, and how they are able to augment beauty. He laments the heavy electric lighting of the West and its introduction to Japan, and shows how the artificial, bright and polished aesthetic of the West contrasts unfavourably with the moody and natural light of the East. Dreamy, melancholic and mysterious, In Praise of Shadows is a haunting insight into a forgotten world.

£10.99
Image Leonora Carrington: The Hearing Trumpet
Surreal and splendidly unconventional, The Hearing Trumpet is an apocalyptic fairytale quest about an occult old ladies’ home and the spry nonagenarian who ends up there. After coming into possession of a hearing trumpet, 92-year-old Marian Leatherby discovers her son’s plans to send her to a nursing home. But this is no ordinary place… Strange rituals, orgiastic nuns, levitating abbesses, animalistic humans, humanistic animals, a search for the Holy Grail and a plan to escape to Lapland and knit a tent… Surrealist painter Leonora Carrington’s novel is an exhilarating journey brimming with laugh-out-loud humour and absurd lunacy.

£24.99
Image Giacomo Casanova: The Story of My Life, Volume 2
The Story of My Life is the explosive and exhilarating autobiography by the infamous libertine Giacomo Casanova. Intense and scandalous, Casanova's extraordinary adventures take the listener on an incredible voyage across 18th-century Europe – from France to Russia, Poland to Spain and Turkey to Germany, with Venice at their heart. He falls madly in love, has wild flings and delirious orgies, and encounters some of the most brilliant figures of his time, including Catherine the Great, Louis XV and Benjamin Franklin. He holds a verbal dual with Voltaire, a pistol duel with a Polish noble, and finds himself hauled before the court multiple times, including in London, where the judge in question turns out to be none other than Henry Fielding. His appetite for life is voracious; for him, a life lived close to the precipice is the only life worth living. The book is divided into six sections. Volume 2 contains the third and fourth sections: '3: The Eternal Quest' and '4: Adventures in the South'.

£100.00
Image Émile Zola: Nana
Nana Coupeau is a beautiful woman, able to attract men of enormous wealth with the crook of her finger. Part-time prostitute, part-time actress, she makes her debut in a mediocre operetta 'The Blonde Venus' at the bustling Paris World's Fair of 1867. She can't sing, act or dance, yet she is stunning. Nana soon rockets through elite Parisian society, and, blinded by desire, men crawl to her feet, yielding to her every demand. Affections are manipulated, hearts are broken; fortunes are gutted and inheritances squandered. The poverty and violence of Nana's upbringing have led her to a cold and profligate life – a metaphoric indictment of the excesses of France's Second Empire, and a striking example of Zola's Naturalism.

£50.00
Image Samuel Richardson: Clarissa, Volume 2 or The Histo
A milestone in the history of the novel, Samuel Richardson's epistolary and elaborate Clarissa follows the life of a chaste young woman desperate to protect her virtue. When beautiful Clarissa Harlowe is forced to marry the rich but repulsive Mr Solmes, she refuses, much to her family's chagrin. She escapes their persecution with the help of Mr Lovelace, a dashing and seductive rake, but soon finds herself in a far worse dilemma. Terrifying and enlightening, Clarissa weaves a tapestry of narrative experimentation into a gripping morality tale of good versus evil. The recording is divided into three volumes.

£85.00
Image Henry James: Daisy Miller
Daisy Miller is a young American girl travelling Europe with her mother and younger brother. While in Vevey, Switzerland, she becomes acquainted with Frederick Winterbourne, an idle expatriate, of well-to-do Americans. Winterbourne, who observes and critiques young Daisy through their brief acquaintanceship, is infatuated with her irreverent behaviour. Daisy flaunts society's rules and uncompromising standards; she is charming, spontaneous and unpretentious, and her audacity shocks the Europeans, who consider her an uncultivated flirt. The sophisticated Winterbourne remains smitten with Daisy, but his classical values stand in his way…

£10.99
Image Honoré de Balzac: Father Goriot
Impoverished young aristocrat Eugène de Rastignac is determined to climb the social ladder and impress himself on Parisian high society. While staying at the Maison Vauquer, a boarding house in Paris's rue Neuve-Sainte-Geneviève, he encounters Jean-Joachim Goriot, a retired vermicelli maker who has spent his entire fortune supporting his two daughters. The boarders strike up a friendship and Goriot learns of Rastignac's feelings for his daughter Delphine. He begins to see Rastignac as the ideal son-in-law, and the perfect substitute for Delphine's domineering husband. But Rastignac has other opportunities too, as the notorious criminal Vautrin, 'The Death Dodger', offers to murder the brother of a wealthy woman, giving the ambitious young lawyer a clear path to her fortune… Profound and realistic, Father Goriot is a startling glimpse into the vanity and selfishness of 19th-century Paris. It is considered one of the finest works of Balzac's La Comédie Humaine.

£35.00
Image Giacomo Casanova: The Story of My Life, Volume 3
The Story of My Life is the explosive and exhilarating autobiography by the infamous libertine Giacomo Casanova. Intense and scandalous, Casanova's extraordinary adventures take the listener on an incredible voyage across 18th-century Europe – from France to Russia, Poland to Spain and Turkey to Germany, with Venice at their heart. He falls madly in love, has wild flings and delirious orgies, and encounters some of the most brilliant figures of his time, including Catherine the Great, Louis XV and Benjamin Franklin. He holds a verbal dual with Voltaire, a pistol duel with a Polish noble, and finds himself hauled before the court multiple times, including in London, where the judge in question turns out to be none other than Henry Fielding. His appetite for life is voracious; for him, a life lived close to the precipice is the only life worth living. The book is divided into six sections. Volume 3 contains the fifth and sixth sections: '5: In London and Moscow' and '6: Spanish Passions'.

£95.00
Image Charles Dickens: Ghost Stories
Charles Dickens was a master of the macabre. His stories of madness, murder and revenge, often imbued with a sympathetic moral undertone, have continued to thrill and chill readers ever since they were written. Here then are 15 tales that display the full range of Dickens's Gothic talents. The Signalman, perhaps the most well-known, is a chilling story about a mysterious figure and its deathly omen; The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain shows the consequences for those who make deals with the dead; The Portrait-Painter's Story follows an artist who paints a non-living person by memory; and Captain Murderer and the Devil's Bargain, a bedtime story from Dickens's own childhood, tells of a bloodthirsty man who kills his brides and bakes them into pies. Among others, the collection also includes A Christmas Carol, The Baron of Grogzwig from The Pickwick Papers, and The Ghost in the Bride's Chamber, a novella co-written with Wilkie Collins.

£50.00
Image Samuel Richardson: Clarissa, Volume 3 or The Histo
A milestone in the history of the novel, Samuel Richardson's epistolary and elaborate Clarissa follows the life of a chaste young woman desperate to protect her virtue. When beautiful Clarissa Harlowe is forced to marry the rich but repulsive Mr Solmes, she refuses, much to her family's chagrin. She escapes their persecution with the help of Mr Lovelace, a dashing and seductive rake, but soon finds herself in a far worse dilemma. Terrifying and enlightening, Clarissa weaves a tapestry of narrative experimentation into a gripping morality tale of good versus evil. The recording is divided into three volumes.

£85.00
Image Wilfred Thesiger: The Marsh Arabs
For a period of seven years, Wilfred Thesiger canoed through the marshes at the confluence of Iraq's Tigris and Euphrates rivers, living among the native Madan tribes and their islands made of reeds. Now extinct, their ancient way of life is speculated to have existed for 5,000 years, going back to the days of ancient Sumer, and possessed a unique culture found nowhere else in the Middle East. Thesiger documents the tribes' conflicts, traditions, cuisine, relationships, justice systems and art, and reveals how they built their unique water-borne society, with its beautiful canoes (taradas) and stately guest houses (mudhifs) – it is a remarkable familiarity gained through Thesiger's innate understanding of tribal ritual and etiquette, and the trust he earned through the use of a basic medical supply kit that he brought along with him. Poetic and immersing, The Marsh Arabs brings alive the sights, sounds and smells of the marshes, and a culture that has now vanished forever.

£27.99
Image Ted Simon: Dreaming of Jupiter
When Ted Simon rode 64,000 miles round the world on his 500c Triumph Tiger, he inspired thousands of motorcyclists to begin their own adventures, including Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman, who chronicled their travels in Long Way Round. Nearly thirty years later, Ted Simon took to the road again to retrace the epic journey he made in his 40s. He meets up with old friends and acquaintances, revisits old landmarks and locations, and rediscovers himself, as well as the world, along the way. Dreaming of Jupiter is a remarkable achievement and a fitting sequel to Jupiter's Travels, the groundbreaking classic of motorcycle adventure.

£50.00
Image Norman Lewis: Naples ’44
Naples '44 is an unflinching autobiographical account of a year in Naples after the armistice and Allied landings in Sorrento in 1943. Working as a British counterintelligence officer under the Allied occupation, Lewis documents the rich pageant of life in the city and its surrounding areas. There is suffering and squalor: criminal gangs are on the rise, along with typhus and black market commerce, and the female population is forced into part-time prostitution, simply to obtain food. Corruption is rife as a Genovese crime family member makes his way into the US army administration, and local hospitals, short on supplies, buy equipment back from those who stole it. There is farce and humour too, witnessed in the Roman uncle paid handsomely to simply appear at funerals and lend an air of gravitas, and in Lewis's own experience of vetting proposed marriages between British soldiers and local women. Unsparing, penetrating and profoundly humane, Naples '44 is a moving portrait of the costs of war, and the resilience of a society under extreme stress.

£24.99
Image DELETED
£8.99
Image HEROES & HEROINES FROM CLA
£8.99
Image A LOVER'S GIFT: FROM HER T
£8.99
Image DICKINSON: Great Poets
Born in Massachusetts in 1830, Emily Dickinson composed over 1770 poems; but apart from her closest friends, no-one knew she was writing at all. Only after her death was her astonishing output discovered and published. A reclusive figure for much of her life, few could have imagined the range of her subjects, the intensity of her imagination or the powerful delicacy of her writing. Emily Dickinson is one of America's greatest writers. This selection includes 147 of her best known poems, and is a perfect introduction to her unique voice.

£8.99
Image The Great Gatsby
£10.99
Image SOAMES: Famous People in History
Alexander the Great, Queen Elizabeth I, Abraham Lincoln, Christopher Columbus, Horatio Nelson, William Shakespeare and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart all changed the world in which they lived. This lively history of fifteen great personalities introduces a new series in the Junior Classics range. Designed for the eight to twelve year olds, it is presented in normal Naxos AudioBooks style with classical music which brings the periods to life.

£10.99
Image Great Rulers Of Ancient Rome
The mighty Roman Empire held the ancient world in awe and presided over unprecedented advances in civilization which still hold sway over our language, architecture and municipal organisation today. A notably autocratic regime, the succession of colourful personalities that headed one of the world's most powerful empires, makes for riveting listening. From the magnetic but divisive figure of Caesar via the capricious, vengeful Nero to the belligerent, martially-skilful Constantine, the careers of these Roman rulers were thrillingly eventful. Classics scholar and writer Hugh Griffith introduces the rulers and the principal events associated with them in Naxos AudioBooks's successful Junior Classics series.

£10.99
Image SHAKESPEARE: The Tempest
Sir Ian McKellen, fresh from his performance as Gandalf in Lord of the Rings is Prospero, and heads a strong cast in Shakespeare's last great play. The wronged duke raises a tempest to shipwreck his old opponents on his island so that he can ensure justice is done. With Emilia Fox as Miranda, Scott Handy in the pivotal role of the sprite Ariel and Ben Owukwe as Caliban, this new production directed by John Tydeman, balances the magic and the earthiness with music playing a key role.

£10.99
Image BECKETT: Waiting for Godot
Samuel Beckett, one of the great avant-garde Irish dramatists and writers of the second half of the twentieth century, was born on 13 April 1906. He died in 1989. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969. His centenary will be celebrated throughout 2006 with performances of his major plays, but the most popular of them all will be, without doubt, the play with which he first made his name, Waiting for Godot. It opened the gates to the theatre of the absurd as four men appear on the stage, apparently with purpose but (perhaps) waiting for someone called Godot. It is stark, funny, bemusing and still deeply affecting half a century since its first production. In this new recording for audiobook, John Tydeman, for many years head of BBC Radio Drama, takes a fresh look at one of the milestones in Western drama. It follows the highly acclaimed recordings of Beckett's Trilogy, Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable published by Naxos AudioBooks.

£10.99
Image DRAGON TALES
£10.99
Image Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
£10.99
Image COLLINS: The Moonstone
When Rachel Verinder inherits the Moonstone, a huge and priceless diamond, her delight turns to dismay when the gem disappears. But this is no ordinary theft. Sergeant Cuff of Scotland Yard is called in and immediately suspects an intricate plot. However, not even his powers of detection can penetrate fully the mysteries surrounding the diamond. And as we listen to each character tell their version of the events, layer upon layer of drama and suspense builds to the final and astonishing d?®noument of the first, and most magnificent English detective novel.

£13.99
Image SHAKESPEARE: Henry V
This widely-studied play is one of the best sellers of the Shakespeare canon. This production is the seventh Shakespeare play in the series undertaken by Naxos AudioBooks in conjunction with Cambridge University Press.

£13.99
Image SHAKESPEARE: King Lear
The tragedy of King Lear receives an outstanding performance in an all-star cast led by Britain's senior classical actor, Paul Scofield. He is joined by Alec McCowen as Gloucester, Kenneth Branagh as The Fool, Harriet Walter as Gonerill, Sara Kestelman as Regan and Emilia Fox as Cordelia. This is the ninth recording of Shakespeare plays undertaken by Naxos AudioBooks in conjunction with Cambridge University Press, and is directed by John Tydeman. It was released to mark the eightieth birthday of Paul Scofield in January 2002.

£13.99
Image PHILLIPS:Queen Elizabeth II
£13.99
Image STORIES FROM SHAKESPEARE
£13.99
Image DANTE: The Divine Comedy: Inferno
Abandon all hope you who enter here' (Lasciate ogne speranza voi ch'intrate) Dante's Hell is one of the most remarkable visions in Western literature. An allegory for his and future ages, it is, at the same time, an account of terrifying realism. Passing under a lintel emblazoned with these frightening words, the poet is led down into the depths by Virgil and shown those doomed to suffer eternal torment for vices exhibited and sins committed on earth. Inferno is the first part of the long journey which continues through redemption to revelation?á- through Purgatory and Paradise?á- and, in this translation prepared especially for Audiobook, his images are as vivid as when the poem was first written in the early years of the fourteenth century.

£13.99
Image THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD CUP
£13.99
Image Mrs Dalloway
£19.99
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